search instagram arrow-down

Archives

Top Posts

Tags

#Careers africa african leaders African Leadership african women African Youth ALU Ban Bossy business career advice career women Commentary Culture Democracy development Economics education entrepreneurship feminism finance Fred Swaniker Freedom Gender Gender Activism Gender Equality heritage investments mbewu mbewu movement mbewumovement mbewu movement founder mentor session mentorship music Networking Pay-It-Forward Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka Sisonke Msimang South Africa Thought Leadership travel wealth management Women women's day Women Empowerment Women in Leadership womens month Xhosa Youth Youth Day

“It’s funny how money changes situations…” (L. Hill)

At 27 years old, a good 3 years away from 30, I find myself having mini anxiety attacks. #SAVE #SAVE #SAVE! Something I wish I had done consistently my whole life. I did not grow up in a rich home, I am not a ‘trust fund baby’ nor did I grow up in a home where I was taught how to be financially savvy; it is something I have had to figure out along the way. Here is some unsolicited advice on how I would have better managed my finances so as not to be in the ‘fix’ I am in now- 27 and living at home (*scream*).

Yes my mother opened a bank account for me when I was about 9 years old and I remember the excitement every time I would either go deposit or withdraw money as a kid either for: a watch, or a toy or for ice cream. Those were the days!

However, fast-forward, I never saved a cent throughout my undergraduate days- I used up every single cent that was sent to me by mother. I wonder; did anyone actually save some their University undergrad pocket money?

Fast-forward even further…in comes the first salary I ever received at 21. I paid my rent, petrol, travelled locally and went out every month. Light bulb moment-thanks to a conversation I had with a friend of mine about work, life and growing up. In the conversation, she told me about her savings account and the importance of having money locked up away in case of an emergency rainy day. I then opened a savings account the very next day. Thanks to another conversation I later had with another girlfriend who said to me:

  • Save for property
  • Save to invest in the money market
  • Save to travel

Four years’ later of saving successfully, I then made my first “grown up” money spending decision, I then decided to invest my savings into my postgraduate degree studies abroad. With a bit of extra help from my family, this was one of the best decisions I ever made that left my bank account as dry as a chicken bone.

Nonetheless, I still feel that had the culture of saving (smartly) been instilled in me at 9 years old, the day I opened my first bank account, I would not be where I am today.Now that I know better, I will do better! I hope I have inspired you to do the same. Here is a short video by Suze Orman on how to save:

If you have any advice for all the Mbewu Movement blog readers and Mbewu Movement Community members, feel free to comment on the blog or send us an email at: mbewumovement@googlegroups.com.

Watch this space for more tips on money matters by Mbewu Founding Member and ‘working gal’ blogger Ayanda Sepamla

Leave a Reply
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: